30,000 mile service

Thursday, Sep 22 2016 [29,884 miles]

The LAMPF indicator came on during the trip back from Sequoia National Park on Sunday and the rear tire is at the wear bars. I’m close enough to 30,000 miles that I’ll do a service while attending to the headlamp and tire. There isn’t much to this service other than an oil change, anyway.

I started the service by hooking up the GS-911 and doing an autoscan to search for logged faults. The only report fault was that my headlight was out. Duh!

Burned out headlamp

Burned out headlamp

Burned out headlamp
Replacement lamp

Replacement lamp

Replacement lamp

One of these days I’ll remember to change bulbs before putting bike on the lift. Since I use a front wheel chock to hold the bike I can’t turn the handlebars which makes bulb access more difficult than it has to be. No matter. A new bulb is in the bike and it works.

Dirty

Dirty

Dirty
Not much spooge

Not much spooge

Not much spooge

The bike is dirty. I can tell I’m going to be spending more time cleaning than doing service items. So it goes. I removed (and cleaned) the bash plate and pulled the drain plug. The engine was close to operating temps – I let it warm up while reading the fault codes. Not much spooge on the magnetic drain plug. Good.

Draining oil

Draining oil

Draining oil
New filter and crush ring

New filter and crush ring

New filter and crush ring
Ready for new filter

Ready for new filter

Ready for new filter

While the oil was draining I did some more cleaning. I pulled the filter and cleaned up where the filter attaches.

Still using this oil

Still using this oil

Still using this oil
Coolant level

Coolant level

Coolant level

Four quarts of 5W-40 makes the bike happy. I add about 3 1/2 quarts then start the bike to check for leaks around the filter and the drain plug. No leaks. I turned off the engine and removed the side pannel to check the coolant level. It wasn’t down much, but as long as I was there I topped the reservoir off. I also added the remaining 1/2 quart of oil. That brought the level to the top of the red ring on the sight glass.

At the wear bars

At the wear bars

At the wear bars

I’ll change the rear tire tomorrow. I checked the other items on the service check list. My rear brake rotor is at 4.66 mm. It is not going to make it to 50 K miles. The front rotors are barely worn. The front brake pads are OK. I’ll check the rear pads when I pull the wheel. Brake fluid levels front and rear are OK. So is the clutch fluid level. The battery went on the charger. The charger soon indicated that the battery was fully charged. That’s all for now.

Friday, Sep 23 2016 [29,884 miles]

Easier with power tools

Easier with power tools

Easier with power tools

Some things are easier with power tools. Removing wheel screws can be one of those things. It took the rattle gun a bit of time to loosen some of the screws. That surprised me. They were torqued to the specified 60 N-m when the tire was last changed about a year ago.

Brake pads OK for now

Brake pads OK for now

Brake pads OK for now

While the wheel and mud guard were off the bike I checked out the brake pads. They are OK for now. The originals were replaced at 18K miles. I’m guessing I’ll get the same life out of these meaning I’ll replace them next service even though they’ll have a little life left.

Yes, I know I don’t have to remove the mud guard to remove the rear tire. I find it easier plus I get a better view of the inside brake pad.

Dirty wheel on stand

Dirty wheel on stand

Dirty wheel on stand
New and old

New and old

New and old

It took much less time to remove the old tire from the wheel than it did to get the wheel (mostly) clean. I used my head this service and moved the wheel to the garage sink. That made for easier cleaning. I used to use rags while the wheel was on the stand, going back and forth between stand and sink to rince the rags. Dumb.

Out of balance wheel

Out of balance wheel

Out of balance wheel
New tire mounted on balanced wheel

New tire mounted on balanced wheel

New tire mounted on balanced wheel

After changing and balancing the front wheel it dawned on me that I should balance the wheel less tire. Many tires are close enough to not need extra weights. I did that with the rear wheel this go around. I removed two ounces of weights that were at two different positions and replaced them with 3/4 oz. That was almost enough to perfectly balance the wheel. Another 1/4 oz was too much.

After mounting the tire I put it back on the balance stand. Yup. The wheel with tire acts the same as the wheel without tire. The tire didn’t add any out of balance condition that I could detect. Time to put the wheel back on the bike.

Almost ready for test ride

Almost ready for test ride

Almost ready for test ride
Now ready for test ride

Now ready for test ride

Now ready for test ride

The bike is back together. The fault codes have been cleared with the GS-911 and the service indicator has been reset to 36,000 miles. I’ll take a test ride tomorrow then call the job done.