After the restoration: 9600 Mile Service

Thursday, Nov 18, 2004

At about 9200 miles I finally tracked down the pfffftttt, pfffftttt, pfffftttt sound that had been coming from the left hand side of the bike for the last thousand miles or so. I’d looked for it earlier without luck. Maybe the 5 months the bike sat while I was waiting for the licence plate to be restored instilled some patience in me as I looked for the source this time around. In any case, this time I felt puffs of air as I ran my hand between the cylinder and the exhaust. Guess: blown head gasket.

bottom of left cylinder

bottom of left cylinder

bottom of left cylinder

Not really much to see, but I can sure feel the leak. It’s directly below the bottom head screw. Perhaps it contributed to the dirt that can be seen on the head. I know it’d been contributing to the spooge that’d been showing up on the toe of my left boot.

spark plug

spark plug

spark plug
Carburator

Carburator

Carburator
exhaust pipe

exhaust pipe

exhaust pipe

The plug doesn’t look too bad. I pulled the slide out of the carb and then removed the carb body, destroying part of the gasket that stuck to the head. So it goes. The exhaust header nut was removed, but I didn’t pull the exhaust. The head can come off without having to go that far.

ready to pull head

ready to pull head

ready to pull head
head screws and rocker assemblies

head screws and rocker assemblies

head screws and rocker assemblies
blown gasket

blown gasket

blown gasket

I removed the rocker arm assemblies and the head screws that held them. The bottom short screw was then removed, followed by the top screw. Slight pressure on the exhaust header gave me enough clearance to remove the head. Yep, the gasket needs replacing.

cylinder

cylinder

cylinder
head

head

head
head and gasket

head and gasket

head and gasket

These three images show the path of the leak. The head will need some dressing before I stick it back on the bike with a new gasket.

dressed head

dressed head

dressed head
new gasket

new gasket

new gasket
ready to ride

ready to ride

ready to ride

A very fine file followed by some crocus cloth got the head ready. It went on the bike with a new gasket. Head screws were torqued in steps in a crossed pattern, 15 ft-lbs, 20 ft-lbs, then 25 ft-lbs. I’ll check the torque again when I do the 9600 mile service.
Valves were adjusted. I found a spare gasket for the carburator in OK condition. I think I’d better order some new ones to have on hand, though. The bike is ready to run. Now back to my spare rear end project.

Saturday, Jan 22, 2005

It took a bit more than 6 months to put 1200 miles on the bike, but much of that time I was waiting for the license plate I’d sent out to be restored. The result was quite nice, but I’m not sure it was worth 5 months of down time.

9597 miles

9597 miles

9597 miles
oil drain plug

oil drain plug

oil drain plug
one metal flake

one metal flake

one metal flake

I came back from some errands after breakfast with the [Groeger[(/saturday/) group with just a few miles less than 9600. After a short wait to let things cool just a bit I drained the oil. This time the magnetic drain plug contained one metal flake. This is better than the last oil change where several flakes were found. The flakes are from a dark metal, not shiny as I’d expect if it was a bearing. I’m not too concerned at this point, but will continue to monitor things.

rear end overflow

rear end overflow

rear end overflow
rear end drain

rear end drain

rear end drain

Next was the rear end. I’d not normally check the rear end at this point but found problems last service. I pulled the fill plug and found the fluid level overflowing. Probably a bad seal between rear end and drive shaft. Next I pulled the drain plug. The magnetic tip on the plug is about the same as it was last time. OK. I’ll pull this rear end apart (again). I was afraid this might happen and have a fresh rear end ready to put on the bike.

drive shaft oil

drive shaft oil

drive shaft oil

I checked the drive shaft oil because of what I found when checking the rear end. As expected, there was less oil than there should be. I’d estimate I pulled about 20 CC from the drive shaft instead of the 100 CC that would normally be there. I’m sure it migrated to the rear end, causing the overflow I saw there.

OK, I’m going to swap rear ends, pull the front swing arm off so I can lube the bearings properly (more on this later), and check the front wheel bearings, in addition to the normal fluid changes that the service schedule calls for. Fun stuff.

Sunday, Jan 23, 2005

The fog finally broke this morning. It’s not too cold working in the garage with the sun providing a little heat. Time to swap out my final drive.

muffler spacer

muffler spacer

muffler spacer
clean pipes

clean pipes

clean pipes

I think Scott showed me this trick. I added a washer as a spacer between the right muffler mounting tab and the frame. It makes the right muffler stick out just slightly, but gives the bike a more balanced look from the rear.

I remove the mufflers and, as I usually do when they are off the bike, gave them a good cleaning. Some 0000 steel wool and Mothers polish got the road grime off. Too bad it’s not that easy to remove the scratches from the time the pipes came off the bike while riding down the freeway.

ready to remove wheel

ready to remove wheel

ready to remove wheel
balance wheel

balance wheel

balance wheel

I pulled the wheel and checked its balance while I had it off the bike. The balancer is the Marc Parnes unit with the addition of a front wheel reducing spacer to center the wheel bearings. I’d checked the rear wheel bearings a few months ago. Of course I cleaned the hubcap and rims while the wheel was off the bike, too.

final drive mount

final drive mount

final drive mount
a pair of drives

a pair of drives

a pair of drives

I removed the mounting nuts and then unscrewed the right hand shock mount and removed the drive. The brake shoes came off along with the brake lever – I’ll use both with the replacement drive. The paper gasket between drive shaft and drive was in excellent shape. It too will be used with the replacement drive.

bottle jack

bottle jack

bottle jack
brake shoes

brake shoes

brake shoes

The drive mounted to the drive shaft, but the shock mounting bolt did not want to start. A bottle jack under the drive helped line up the shock mounting hole. The bolt started much easier this way. The brake pivot and cam were very lightly greased and the brake shoes installed.

brake linkage

brake linkage

brake linkage
rear wheel

rear wheel

rear wheel

The original brake lever is installed along with the rest of the brake linkage, lightly greased. The drive splines were greased when I finished rebuilding the drive. The wheel was put back on the bike. The bike came off the center stand and I bounced it up and down a few times before putting it back on the stand and tightening the pinch bolt.

The last things today were filling the drive shaft and the final drive with gear oil and spinning the wheel while adjusting the rear brake. I left the mufflers off the bike as I want to pull the pipes for for a good cleaning. I’ll get to that and other things in the days to come.

Monday, Jan 24, 2005

Today I’m going to start work on the front end of the bike. The bike has a slight front end shimmy at about 35-40 MPH. Nothing dangerous, but annoying. I checked the back end of the bike – swing arm and rear wheel bearings – a month or so ago. This time I’ll check the front.

jack fixture

jack fixture

jack fixture

I use this wooden fixture to support the bike when jacking it up to get the front wheel off the ground. The side stand is slightly in the way, so I support the bike by the bottom of the engine at the oil pan mounting flange, not the oil pan.

front brake cables

front brake cables

front brake cables
jack stands

jack stands

jack stands

This time I remembered to detach the front brake cable before removing the front wheel. Once the wheel was off the bike I put some jack stands under the front swing arm. This is more stable than the bottle jack. Also, the bottle jack looses pressure over time.

bearing stack removal

bearing stack removal

bearing stack removal
bearing stack

bearing stack

bearing stack

I’ve an old rear axle which is combined with a length of pipe to form my wheel bearing maintenance tool. The pipe goes over the end of the axle to keep the bearing stack aligned. A few hits with a dead blow hammer and the stack is out, reading for cleaning and checking. Of course the bearing retaining nut is first removed.

bearing stack before cleaning

bearing stack before cleaning

bearing stack before cleaning
checking pre load

checking pre load

checking pre load

All of the parts of the stack are removed, cleaned, inspected, lightly oiled, then re-assembled to check the bearing pre-load. The bearings are fine. The pre-load was a slight touch too tight. Adding a shim would make it too loose. I gave the outer spacer a few figure eights on some 600 grit paper and tried again. Perfect.

new grease

new grease

new grease
hub bore

hub bore

hub bore
stack in hub

stack in hub

stack in hub

The stack was well greased then placed back in the hub with the help of a dead blow mallet. I like it when I see that seating the stack in the hub forces a bit of grease out of the top bearing. It means I used enough! The spring, hub cap, thrust bushing, and bearing retainer are installed and the wheel is just about done.

wheel balance

wheel balance

wheel balance

I checked the tire air pressure. It was down about 2 lbs. I brought it up to 28 PSI. Then I put the tire on the balancer. The weights needed to move a bit. After balancing I removed my greasy finger prints with the help of some Mothers wheel polish. The wheel is ready to go back on the bike. But first…

The Koni dampers I put on the bike as part of the restoration are much stiffer than my /2 memories, even at their lightest setting. Others on the /2 mailing list noticed the same thing. I scored a pair of NOS Boge front dampers that feel pretty good. I’m going to put them on the bike and see how it rides. Worst case: I’ll have to put the Koni’s back if the Boge don’t work out.

Boge front dampers

Boge front dampers

Boge front dampers
Top damper eye

Top damper eye

Top damper eye

The first picture is of the replacement dampers. The second shows the upper shock eye for the left side shock assembly.
Other than the elongation, the silent block is OK, so I will still use it. I’m curious to see of the right side is the same.

damper removal

damper removal

damper removal
tale of two dampers

tale of two dampers

tale of two dampers

I use the Ed Korn shock spring compressor to save knuckles when removing the damper. A side-by-side comparison shows that the Boge has a slightly longer throw. The damper rod is thicker on the Koni. The rubber “donuts” that are hard to get on/off the Koni slide down the rod of the Boge.

shock assembly parts

shock assembly parts

shock assembly parts
wheel and shock

wheel and shock

wheel and shock

The assembly goes together easily. No anti-seize was used. I learned that lesson. The shock assembly and tire are put asside for now. I’ll change dampers in the right hand side later. Then the fender and front swing arm will be removed to check the swing arm bearings.

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005

I started today’s work by changing the damper in the right side shock assembly. No pictures as the procedure was a duplication of yesterday’s work.

No shocks

No shocks

No shocks
No fender and swing-arm

No fender and swing-arm

No fender and swing-arm

Take a good look at the first picture and see if you can spot the problem. Give up? Without the shock assemblies the two jack stands are doing nothing more than holding the swing arm off the ground. I removed the fender then positioned one of the jack stands under the timing cover where it can support the front of the bike.

clean front fender

clean front fender

clean front fender
chipped paint

chipped paint

chipped paint
touch-up

touch-up

touch-up

I washed the front fender; it’s easy when it’s off the bike. It’s also easier to see the chipped paint on the leading and trailing edges of the fender when clean. I wiped off the areas around the chips with an alcohol swab, waited for the alcohol to evaporate, then applied some touch-up paint. I’m more concerned about rust prevention than looks, but it looks pretty good, too.

swing-arm axle removed

swing-arm axle removed

swing-arm axle removed
swing-arm seal

swing-arm seal

swing-arm seal

The front swing-arm came off pretty easy once I broke it free. It was torqued way too tight. I pulled the thrust bushing out of the seal on both sides. The seals are the double lipped variety which may be one of the reasons I couldn’t get new grease in through the swing-arm grease fitting. The seals wouldn’t let the old grease out!
I’m checking to make sure I’ve got replacement seals before I pull these. I do need to pull them so I can clean and check the bearings.

partial bike

partial bike

partial bike

The bike looks funny with no front end. Since access is easy I detailed the down tubes and cleaned out the grime around the steering damper. There’s no sign of steering bearing play or notching.
I’m hoping that my front end shimmy was caused by the (lack of) front wheel balance.

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005

First thing this afternoon was to check out the paint on the front fender. I added some more touch-up paint in a few spots then put the fender out of the way to dry.

swing arm seal

swing arm seal

swing arm seal
Seal removed

Seal removed

Seal removed

The only way to check the swing arm bearing is to first remove the seal. I clipped off the soft lip then used Ed Korn’s seal/race removal tool to pull the seal. I ordered replacement seals last night as I didn’t have any of this size socked away. The black grease is from my restoration. The blue/green boat trailer grease that I tried to input via the grease fitting never made it to either of the bearings.

race wear marks

race wear marks

race wear marks
cleaned bearings

cleaned bearings

cleaned bearings

The bearings seemed a bit stiff until I cleaned out all of the old grease using a WD-40 bath, Simple Green and a toothbrush, hot water, another WD-40 bath, then blown dry with compressed air. They are fine. I lightly oiled them and put them in a zip lock bag.

The races have visual marks that show the limited range of movement of the swing arm. The marks can not be felt with the finger-nail test. I’ll not replace the races, this time.

dirty pipes

dirty pipes

dirty pipes
clean pipes

clean pipes

clean pipes

The pipes came off for cleaning. The last remnants of the melted plastic bag that once got caught on the center stand came off with some elbow grease, 0000 steel wool, and Mothers. The crossover tube came out looking almost new.

side stand bolt

side stand bolt

side stand bolt

Before putting the pipes back on I wanted to look at the side stand bolt. It sometimes comes loose. The pipes are in the way so it can not come all the way out, but the other end of the bolt is the stop used to keep the side stand from moving too far forward. I remove the bolt, cleaned things, added some grease where the side stand attaches to its base, then replaced the bolt using some medium thread locker. That should solve the problem.

no oil

no oil

no oil

When putting the side stand back together I noticed the dip stick wasn’t screwed in. I don’t screw it in until there is oil in the bike. May as well do that now. I double checked that I’d torqued the drain plug (I did) then added two quarts of oil. Now the dip stick can be screwed in. That’s it for fluids. I’m not checking the transmission this service.

pipes and mufflers back on bike

pipes and mufflers back on bike

pipes and mufflers back on bike

The pipes and mufflers were put back on the bike with lots of anti-seize. I put everything on loosly, then tighten working from the front of the bike to the rear. By the time all is tight there are lots of anti-sieze colored finger prints over the pipes. A final bit of cleaning/polishing makes it look pretty again.

I’ll wait until the seals arrive before I do anything else. The only thing I have to do is re-install the front end and re-torque the left cylinder head. I’ll probably re-torque both cylinder heads and check and adjust the valves as long as the valve covers are off the bike.

Friday, Jan 28 2005

Jeff came over with some spare swing-arm seals. I’ll use them then give him the ones I ordered when they arrive (probably tomorrow). The races and bearings were greased and put in the swing-arm. The cavity between bearing and seal was filled with grease, then the seals installed. No pictures… I was talking with Jeff, instead of playing with the camera.

The swing-arm was mounted on the bike. I had no problem getting the swing-arm axle to line up. The swing-arm feels good with no play. I installed the fender, shocks and then the front wheel. The jack and jack stand were put away. I’ll re-torque the heads and check the valves this weekend.

Sunday, Jan 30 2005

spark plug

spark plug

spark plug

The left plug looks OK. It’s out of the bike because I need to re-torque the head. It’s been about 400 miles since I replaces the gasket. Close enough. The 6 head screws are backed off a bit then brought to 25 lbs-ft in 5 lbs-ft increments using a cross pattern.

valve adjust

valve adjust

valve adjust

After a re-torque the valves were adjusted. I figured that as long as I was doing the left side I may as well do the right side, too. The head screws on the exhaust side of the right are tight. This is one of the signs of a butterhead according to Duane’s page on /2 cylinder heads. I set the torque as best I could then adjusted the valves. I think finding a replacement head is going to move up my priority list.

ready to ride

ready to ride

ready to ride

The bike is back together and ready to ride. I should probably check the timing. I’ll do that with a timing light next time I start the bike. The front brake may need a slight adjustment, too.