After the restoration: Initial tune

February 2000

Once the bike was kicked over a vacuum gauge was used to balance the idle speed. Balance at RPM was a bit more difficult as the brand-new-from-BMW throttle cables give next to zero play. I also played with the timing.

In front of Groeger Special Tooling

In front of Groeger Special Tooling

In front of Groeger Special Tooling
Reverse angle

Reverse angle

Reverse angle

I rode the bike to Joe Groeger’s where we fiddled with the setting and got things slightly smoother. The bike now has over 30 miles on it since rebuild. The ride included the freeway. I’m keeping the speed/RPM down for now, going no more than 55-60 in the slow lane.

/5 mirror

/5 mirror

/5 mirror
139/140 miles

139/140 miles

139/140 miles
clean enough (1)

clean enough (1)

clean enough (1)
clean enough (2)

clean enough (2)

clean enough (2)

I haven’t really done anything the last 100 miles except replace the aftermarket mirror with a /5 style mirror. It helps. I can see more than my sholder, now. I have added about 1/2 pint of oil. The oil still looks pretty clean; it’s hard to read on the dip-stick.

It’s been wet and (at least in my driveway where the landscapers are mid-deconstruction) muddy. The bike cleans up quite easily. I wipe it off with a damp rag, then wipe the water marks off with a dry rag. These pictures show the bike on leap day.

Broken horn

Broken horn

Broken horn

Yesterday I tried to show someone how well the horn worked. Of course it didn’t. Today I took it apart and found a plastic (bakelite?) insulator in pieces inside the body of the horn. That’s what those little bits are above and to the right of the red multimeter probe in the picture. It’s job was to keep the screw and spring (to the left of the coil at the top of the picture) from shorting to the brass colored metal bit which is part of the horn circuit.

I’ve used a bit of super glue to hold the plastic bits together and then used some epoxy for strength. I also put a bit of heat shrink tubing over the screw to act as an extra insulator. I’ll try to put it back together once the epoxy has set.

Fixed horn

Fixed horn

Fixed horn

The epoxy has set and the horn has been re-assembled. The picture shows the insides prior to putting the cover on. I got the adjustment close using an ohmeter. The horn was then put back on the bike. A slight tweak of the adjustment screw resulted in loud noises, again. I hope the repair will last.