The Breakfast Club: Not my day

Sunday, Apr 26 2015

Today was not my day. On the way back from breakfast I slowed down on northbound 101 to take 92 west. The bike started handling funny. I slowed way down on the 101 to 92 ramp and exited 92 at Delaware. I knew what the problem would be — flat tire. Would I be able to easily find the puncture?

Yup. I may have picked up a screw or roofing nail a while ago and not noticed. This morning the ride ground down the head or otherwise caused whatever was plugging the hole to come undone. Whatever the cause the tire had zero PSI.

I pulled out my various repair kits and selected a plug. I opened a brand new tube of rubber cement and popped the seal. The tube of cement was old enough that the contents were no longer liquid, but instead the consistency of chewing gum. I tried a second tube that had been previously opened. I didn’t expect much. I wasn’t disappointed. The second tube was completely dry.

Some rummaging around in my second repair kit found a third tube. It, too, was still factory sealed. It must have been slightly newer than the first tube in that only half of the contents had semi-hardened. Now I can get to work. Lube the hole. Lube the plug. Insert the plug. Cut off excess. Hook up pump and add air. Done.

The tire is holding air. Or, if it leaking it is leaking very, very slowly. I put my tire repair gear away and put on the riding gear I’d removed to fix the flat. I got in the bike and hit the starter. What’s that warning indicator? Oh, one of my front lamps picked that moment to die. It’s the headlight. I’ve got a spare at home. I may even have a spare on the bike. No matter, I’ll change bulbs when I get home.

But first I need to order more rubber cement.

Puncture

Puncture

Puncture
Repair tools

Repair tools

Repair tools
Holding air

Holding air

Holding air